Now showing items 1-4 of 4

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    Economic significance of work experience : evidence from Thailand 

    Kritsada Wattanasaovaluk; Suchittra Chamnivickorn (National Institute of Development Administration, 2020)

    The decline in labor force due to a rapid transition of population structure to an aging society in Thailand has raised concerns over economic potential of the country and demanded urgent policies to tackle the labor reduction problem. Promoting elderly employment is a possible way of addressing the reduction in labor force, as current and future seniors tend to be healthy and highly educated. They can maintain human capital and remain productive even after retirement. Elders are highly experienced and this human capital enables them to work ...
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    Effect of double college major (degree) on earning in Lao PDR 

    Houngthida Phetsinorath; Suchittra Chamnivickorn (National Institute of Development Administration, 2019)

    There are few studies on the effect of double major (degree) and most studies concentrate on high income countries (Russell, Dolnicar, & Ayoub, 2008; Del Rossi & Hersch, 2008). These studies have found the positive relationship between double major and employment as well as earning in Australia, Singapore, and U.S. A growing number of Laos students pursue double major. However, double major (degree) actually gives graduates greater employment opportunities and earning than single major graduates has not been fully understood. This study aims ...
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    The mismatch in thai labor market : overeducation 

    Akkaya Senkrua; Suchittra Chamnivickorn (National Institute of Development Administration, 2015)

    Greater educational accessibility in Thailand has considerably contributed to a collective higher level of educational attainment of the Thai labor force. Nevertheless, with the ease of access, the number of workers with overeducation has significantly risen. Overeducation refers to a situation in which a person’s education attainment exceeds the requirements of a job, giving rise to a variety of unfavorable outcomes for individuals, employers and society.
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    Self-control against half-intuitive reactions 

    Pakathorn Na Pattalung; Suchittra Chamnivickorn (National Institute of Development Administration, 2013)

    People often make everyday decisions based on their intuition. A large number of experiments in Neuroeconomics and Behavioral Economics draw this conclusion without providing explanations on the reaction-generating processes. These intuitive reactions are efficient and appropriate in many situations. However, when the issue at stake concerns immediate rewards; intuitive reactions usually lead to suboptimal results. In fact, these continued reaction patterns may breed bad habits and act as endogenous constraints to one's making an optimal choice. ...