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dc.contributor.advisorBoon-Anan Phinaitrupen
dc.contributor.authorAlcoba, Rowena Cleminoen
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T06:34:23Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T06:34:23Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifierb208145
dc.identifier187 leavesen
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.nida.ac.th/handle/662723737/5087
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D. (Development Administration))--National Institute of Development Administration, 2019
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examined how public service motivation (PSM), enhanced by workplace trust (WT), will mediate the effects of perceived politics on organizational outcomes in the context of Philippine local bureaucracy. The study investigated the relationship of perception of organizational politics (POP) with organizational commitment (OC), job satisfaction (JS) and workplace stress (WS); and the mediating effects of PSM and WT on these relationships. The underpinnings of three theories – social exchange, self-determination and job demands-resources - explained the complexities of these relationships. The first objective of this research study was to examine how perceived organizational politics will affect organizational outcomes (commitment, satisfaction, and stress), workplace trust, and public service motivation.Second, it aimed to explain the mediating effects of workplace trust and of public service motivation, acting on the relationship between POP and the outcome variables.The third objective was to establish the link between PSM and workplace trust as potential mediators for the focally-predicted relationships. To examine the predicted causal relationships among the variables under study, the research used the quantitative method. It employed the survey method for collecting data using a structured questionnaire based on a five-point Likert scale. Standardized measurement scales that had been used and validated in earlier studies were adapted to measure the variables. To enhance the response rate, the survey was distributed using multiple approaches including online, post-mail, and face-to-face. The population of 144 individuals, out of which 119 valid samples were derived, was comprised of the heads of the local social welfare offices in the city, municipal, and provincial levels of the following seven provinces in the Philippines: Occidental Mindoro, Oriental Mindoro, Marinduque, Romblon, Palawan, Batangas, and Laguna. To analyze the data collected, a number of statistical tools were employed including exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis, as well as regression and path analyses. The study also used structural equation modeling and the process approach of Hayes (2007) to determine the direct paths, and the mediating or indirect effects, respectively. The research results indicated that perceived politics did not have a significant direct relationship with the organizational outcomes (job satisfaction and workplace stress), and neither with PSM. The statistical evidences presented by this study showed that direct causal relationship existed between POP and workplace trust only. However, contrary to what was predicted of a negative correlation between the two, the findings showed a positive correlation. PSM had a significant and positive relationship with job satisfaction and a significant and negative relationship with workplace stress. Similar to PSM, workplace trust was found to be related with JS and WS. These findings confirmed the dominant view about the all-positive outcomes of PSM and WT. WT was also observed to have a positive impact on PSM. These two variables sequentially mediated the indirect relationship of POP with WS, and with JS. There was, however, no observed linkage between the predictive variables and organizational commitment. These findings are contrary to the common notion that a politically-charged environment causes immediate harmful impact on organizational outcomes. The likely effects of perceived politics are indirect and these can be mitigated by workplace trust and public service motivation. The trust behavior of employees enhances their motivation to serve the public interest which consequently attenuates what could be possible adverse effects of POP on satisfaction and stress. The results of this study reaffirm the view that people behave differently towards perceived politics in the workplace. They have implications on strategic human resource management, specifically on how organizations should practice strategic recruitment to improve the organization-employee fit by . While there have been numerous research studies done on the concept of PSM since its conception almost three decades ago, it has not been widely explored beyond the Western perspective.  The study filled this gap in literature, concluding the existence of PSM and high trust behavior among Filipino government employees especially among the respondent social workers. Their motivation to serve the public interest along with trust in the workplace results to enhanced satisfaction and reduced stress. These findings provide policymakers with empirical data and analyses for a practical understanding of the nature of the motivation of government employees and how this can inform the policy discussions to further improve governance and public service.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNational Institute of Development Administrationen
dc.rightsผลงานนี้เผยแพร่ภายใต้ลิขสิทธิ์ของสถาบันบัณฑิตพัฒนบริหารศาสตร์th
dc.subjecte-Thesisen
dc.subject.otherPublic services -- Philippinesen
dc.subject.otherTrust -- Philippinesen
dc.titleExamining the mediating effects of public service motivation and workplace trust on perceived politics and organizational outcomes among frontline service workers in the Philippinesen
dc.typeTexten
dc.rights.holderNational Institute of Development Administrationen
mods.genreDissertation
mods.physicalLocationสถาบันบัณฑิตพัฒนบริหารศาสตร์. สำนักบรรณสารการพัฒนาth
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineDevelopment Administrationen
thesis.degree.grantorNational Institute of Development Administrationen
thesis.degree.departmentSchool of Public Administrationen


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