GSHRD: Dissertations

Permanent URI for this collection

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 6 of 39
  • Thumbnail Image
    Item
    The status of perspectives and challenges of tvet for the National Human Resource Development (NHRD) in MyanMar
    Win, Win Htein; Sombat Kusumavalee (National Institute of Development Administration, 2022)
    Globally Technical and vocational education and training (TVET) has been identified as a major contributor to the National Human Resource Development (NHRD). Many countries have started to acknowledge TVET as a major driving force for sustainable development. However, capitalizing on the potential of TVET requires in-depth understanding of the status and challenges of the existing TVET system and programs as well as various perspectives and views from all stakeholders. The purpose of this study was to explore the status of perspectives and challenges of TVET for NHRD in Myanmar. The study grounded investigations to answer the question; what is the status of perspectives and challenges of TVET in Myanmar? The study applied qualitative research methodology since it provided the researcher with the latitude to answer questions and explore participants’ knowledge and experiences in Myanmar. This exploratory qualitative research has been done through case study approach to gain the in-depth understanding of TVET status and challenges in Myanmar. The study utilized a targeted review of literature, analysis of government and INGO documents. Additionally, the study applied purposive sampling to identify participants and interviews with 35 key stakeholders from both demand and supply sides as illustrative sources of evidence for developing the case study. The study revealed that the current context requires Myanmar to pay more attention to vocational training as a tool to develop its human resources in light of the capacity needs for driving the economy. Moreover, it adds to the small but growing literature on NHRD in Myanmar context.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Item
    The performance management factors affecting on employee's perceived fairness in power generation industry in Thailand
    Panita Sastrawaha; Chiraprapha Akaraborworn (National Institute of Development Administration, 2021)
    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among performance management, relationship with supervisor, organizational culture, and employee’s perceived fairness in order to develop employees’ perceived fairness model in power producer in Thailand. Quantitative method was conducted based on 604 samples from four power producers in private sector and one state-enterprise power producer in Thailand. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was used to analyze the data gathered using the SPSS and AMOS program to assess what factors influence employee’s perceived fairness and how well the proposed model can be used to explain this phenomenon. The results revealed that performance management practices and organizational culture have a positive direct effect on employee’s perceived fairness, while relationship with supervisor has an insignificant effect on employees’ perceived fairness. The results of structural equation modeling using maximum likelihood revealed that according to a variety of fit indices, the proposed model confirmed both absolute fitness and incremental fitness. The value of χ2 = 315.958 df = 76 with p = 0.001, GFI = 0.938, RMSEA = 0.072, AGFI = 0.902, CFI = 0.971 and NFI = 0.962 indicate that all fit indices passed the cut-off values.According to the research results, it is suggested that to enhance employee’s perceived fairness, performance management practices and organizational culture should be integrated designed and implemented. Both performance management practices and organizational culture should be continuously assessed and adjusted to ensure an alignment of the two with organization’s directions and critical success factors, organization’s characteristics, organization’s visions, values, strategies, and its members.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Item
    Mechanisms of resilient organizations: an explanatory case study of the family business in Thailand
    Chayanoot Pungcharoenpong; Sombat Kusumavalee (National Institute of Development Administration, 2020)
    The main objective of this study was to advance the knowledge explaining why organizations are resilient by following Swanson and Chermack’s (2013) theory development in applied disciplines. The study covered only three phases: The conceptualization phase, the operationalization phase, and the confirmation phase. Based on the conceptualization and operationalization phase, nine propositions were identified before data collection based on literature review that explains the concept of resilient organization, such as a successful outcome of crisis management, positive organizational adjustment, and adaptability. Qualitative research design was employed in this study. In this regard, Yin’s (2014) explanatory case study and pattern matching method was employed in order to confirm the propositions and advance the knowledge explaining why organizations are resilient. The context of family business in Thailand was used as the context of study because of two reasons: a) family business has a stake in the Thai economy (Suehiro, 1997); and b) family business was consistently found that it is more resilient than other types of business, and it demonstrates stronger resilience despite an economic crisis (Amann & Jaussaud, 2012; Chrisman et al., 2011; Gupta & Levenburg, 2010; Kachaner et al., 2012; van Essen et al., 2015).The findings were based on the fifteen individual cases of organizations, that showed a resilient pattern and were family businesses in Thailand. According to the cross-case analysis, resilient organizations were created by factors occurred in three time periods. They are 1) before the crisis; 2) being aware of the crisis; and 3) managing the crisis that occurred. This applied to all types of resilient organizations (i.e. recovery resilience; resistant resilience; transformation resilience). Many cases consistently demonstrated that the period before the crisis was a substantial period as it buffered the consequences of crisis and supported the organizations after their crisis. The evidence from the cross-case analysis, in addition, suggested that the organizations in the period before the crisis emphasized on manpower strategies (i.e. building affective feelings and relationships among people in the organizations; developing tonic virtuousness) and management strategies (i.e. strengthening internal organizational operations; knowledge acquisition and past experience). In the face of a crisis, the organizations responded to the crisis by focusing on monetary strategies (i.e. financial saving; low cost operation; handling financial problems), manpower strategies (i.e. staff collaboration; organizational commitment; phasic virtuousness; leadership; attention to and assistance for staff affected by the crisis), management strategies (i.e. property loss mitigation; communication; organizational support; systems improvement; diversified business). Despite the organizational actions before the crisis and in the face of the crisis, resilient organizations also showed mindfulness/being aware of crisis. This was a crucial factor that prompted the organizations to be ready to cope with the crisis. With respect to the discussion of the cross-case findings, many theoretical propositions were confirmed and further indicated a degree of transferability. The analysis showed a degree of transferability of these factors. They are organizational mitigation in the face of a crisis, an appropriate business model generation, sufficiency thinking, tonic and phasic virtuousness, financial reserve, attention to a context, and human resources. The analysis also introduced new findings of this study, which were specifically related to the context of the family business in Thailand. They include the three period factors contributing to resilience development, sufficiency thinking, roles of leaders, organizational support, attention of executives given to their employees, knowledge and past experience, staff collaboration, organizational commitment, communication, virtuousness, quality of products and services, diversified business, and financial handling.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Item
    Antecdent factors for collective leadership development in social enterprises management : case studies of Thai social enterprises
    Tharinee Suratpipit; Chartchai Na Chiangmai (National Institute of Development Administration, 2020)
    A rapid change in today’s world of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity (VUCA) has urged the leaders to operate in the form of collective leadership. As a result, many organizations are shifting from traditional leadership roles of formal leaders or teams of individuals onto other team members depending on the expertise required. However, not many organizations have become successful in achieving leadership transformation as traditional view of leadership focusing on single person role as leader has been rooted in leadership study for a long time. Thus, the current study provides a broad understanding of the antecedent factors that foster collective leadership development in social enterprises management in Thai social enterprises in various industries. A multi-level study at the group and organizational level is provided in order to gain deeper understanding of the phenomenon. Additionally, as human resources play a significant role in facilitating leadership development in the firms, various interventions on organizational development are suggested in the study. In addition, this study deployed the inductive approach using qualitative case studies. Data collection were collected through the interviews with 17 participants in 3 companies based on purposive sampling technique. All 3 companies have been awarded by The Stock Exchange of Thailand (SET) for outstanding performance in driving their business toward sustainability (Sustainability Awards) and listed companies who have their resources both financially and non-financially to support social enterprises (Social Enterprise Investment Award) in 2015. Multiple methods of data collection including interviews, document analysis, survey and participant observation are used along with five stages thematic analysis process to analyze the data. Findings of the study suggested variety of insights. First the concept of collective leadership was described following 5 themes: 1) network of expertise; 2) unwavering process improvement; and 3) mission to achieve unifying goals. Second, the antecedent factors for collective leadership development were explored. There were 4 themes identified to have positive impact to collective leadership development: 1) leadership capability; 2) collaborative network; 3) culture of shred leadership; and 4) collective learning. Third, there were also additional factors that were found to accelerate collective leadership development. Those factors were described into 4 themes according to the following: 1) leadership empowerment; 2) climate for change; 3) continuous learning; and 4) coaching and mentoring system. Finally, a systematic management of business value creation model was proposed. The implications for scholar include the utilization of mixed methods and data triangulation, which enables the richness and quality of the research. Expanding research study to other industry and recruiting more participants from different setting could enrich research results and be able to generalize to wider audiences. The implications for practice include the application of findings as HR interventions in order to facilitate collective leadership development in organizations who have interest for social enterprise management. The interventions suggested in this study consisted of the following: selection and staffing; performance management system; training and development; and organization development. Key limitations in this study included the fact that qualitative approach using interview, document analysis, survey and fiend observation was the major method used for this study, limitation regarding language used in the study, and the small number of participants, which limited the study in terms of ability to generalize findings beyond the sample groups and industries coverage.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Item
    Developing IQA system for graduate-only institution : case study of NIDA (National Institute of Development Administration)
    Thantita Sathirachaiyawit; Chiraprapha Akaraborworn (National Institute of Development Administration, 2019)
    An Internal Quality Assurance system (IQA) in Thai higher education has been developed continuously since 2007 by the Office of the Higher Education Commission of Thailand (OHEC). According to an announcement of the Internal Quality Assurance Commission on Higher Education under the heading “Regulations and Guidelines regarding Higher Education Internal Quality Assurance 2014”, the IQA system was adjusted in two major, different, areas than the previous versions. One of these areas is that each institution has an opportunity to choose its own IQA system. The purpose of this study was to develop an IQA system for a graduate-only institution, and the National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA) was adopted as the case study. The research approach included a focus group and interviews which were used to gather qualitative data regarding internal quality assurance processes in the Thai and NIDA contexts. Data from the focus group, the interviews, and the literature review were integrated and developed into a questionnaire that was used as the major research tool in the Delphi-style research process. Two rounds of the Delphi process were conducted. Subject matter experts (SMEs) rated each question for its relevance to indicate the importance and the level of implementation of quality assurance processes at NIDA.The findings of this study were that the NIDA IQA system needed to have 3 levels of assessment: the program level, faculty level, and institutional level. It was also found that the system should address 24 quality criteria with 72 items under them. Among those 72 items were 7 items under human resource management, working systems, program, student development and support, and public relations quality criteria that should not be excluded from the system as they had perfect Interquartile Range (IQR). As well, a further recommendation was that the quality assurance processes should be conducted annually, to be conducted by a committee of at least 3 persons, each of whom should have knowledge of IQA, and each member of the committee should have experience in being a program director or have held a position related to IQA.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Item
    The meaning of employee engagement of Thai public hospitals under the ministry of public health
    Siriporn Potidokmai; Sombat Kusumavalee (National Institute of Development Administration, 2019)
    Employee engagement plays a significant role in the quality improvement of hospitals in Thailand as it has been set as one of the areas for self-assessment and continuous improvement of hospital quality, 5.1 Employee Engagement, under the 1-5 Human Resource Focus (HRF), one of the criteria of the Hospital Accreditation (HA) standard of Thailand which has been used to drive quality improvement for hospitals since 1997. After reviewing various studies related to employee engagement, it was revealed that the concept of employee engagement remains ambiguous as there are multiple frameworks of engagement conceptualization, in which each framework or approach has its own measurement, as well as conceptual space. This gap could result in an unconnected approach to understanding and developing strategies around employee engagement within organizations. The objectives of this study were to explore the meaning of the employee engagement of Thai public hospitals in the Thai context and to investigate the factors that promote and prevent the employee engagement of Thai public hospitals under the Ministry of Public Health (MOPII). This study employed a qualitative phenomenological approach. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and participatory observations with 13 medical doctors, 15 general support employees, 15 medical support employees, and 15 nurses from three different hospitals across MOPH-owned hospitals, including community, general, and regional hospitals.Conventional content analysis, the frequency count occurrences of words, along with five stages of inductive data analysis were applied for the analysis of the data. The findings revealed 5 common components of the meaning of employee engagement, including positive emotion, wholehearted effort, organization accomplishment, desired behavior, and stay, which were found to be different than the definitions of employee engagement defined in seminal studies. Consequently, the researcher proposed the definition of employee engagement of Thai public hospitals under the MOPH as affective relations in one's work life operationalized by the degree of positive emotion, wholehearted effort, organization accomplishment ambition, desired behavior employment, and willingness to stay happily with the organization, which can be used for the foundation for further studies. Moreover, the findings explored 16 factors that promoted employee engagement, which were categorized into 3 levels, including individual, group, and organization levels. The five factors at the individual level were personal resources, feeling important, relationship with colleagues, prolonged stay, and patient's well- being. The three factors at the group level were collaboration, perceived supervisor support, and team work. The eight factors at the organization level included hospital image, job characteristics, a family-like work climate, job security, leader, compensation, welfare, and learning and development opportunity Furthermore, the findings explored 15 factors that prevented employee engagement including communication problems, generation gaps, high expectation pressures, inadequate compensation and benefits, lack of coordination among departments, lack of discipline, lack of resources, task variety, work overload, lack of team support, people issues, perceived insults, perceived unfairness, a restricted system, and unpleasant results. The implications for practice emphasize how to apply the employee engagement model explored in this study in setting and designing strategies and intervention programs to enhance employee engagement within the organization. The key limitation of this study is the fact that it used self-reported data where the results relied on the openness of the participants. Further, this study involved a small number of participants, which limited the ability to generalize from the findings beyond the sample group.